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With over 158,000 print titles in our collection, the Supreme Court Library provides the most comprehensive range of legal resources in Queensland to the judiciary, legal profession and members of the public with matters before the Courts.

Each week, a selection of important titles recently added to the collection are reviewed by members of the level 16 Quay Central chambers. A full list of new titles is available online via our catalogue, with copies also available for perusal at the Brisbane Reference Desk.

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New Titles

  • The Privilege against Self-Incrimination and Criminal Justice

    Andrew L.T. Choo, The Privilege Against Self-Incrimination and Criminal Justice (Hart Publishing, 2013)

    4 April 2014
    Ronald Dworkin considered that "people have a profound right not to be convicted of crimes of which they are innocent". One justification for a privilege against self-incrimination is the protection of the innocent from wrongful conviction. This justification is premised on the possibility that compulsion to provide potentially self-incriminatory information may produce unreliable information, which, if subsequently used in a criminal trial, may lead to an innocent person being convicted. There is, of course, a distinction between the compulsion to give testimony as opposed to a witness giving evidence of the condition of his or her body. As was pointed out by Gibbs CJ in Sorby v. Commonwealth (1983) 152 CLR 281, 292, a witness is of course required to provide a fingerprint, show his face or some other part of his body that may be identified or, alternatively, to speak or to write so that a jury or another witness may hear his voice or compare his handwriting. In this concise work, Choo examines the origins, rationales and the relevant legal framework in England and Wales in respect of the privilege against self-incrimination. The book then moves into a consideration of the erosion of the privilege against self-incrimination in the face of statutory provisions that provide for failure or refusal to comply with a request for potentially self-incriminatory information. There is an analysis of the nature of the “information” that can be the subject of the privilege of self-incrimination and whilst the book focuses on the position in England and Wales, it draws on the experience of a number of other common law jurisdictions in order to provide comparative responses.

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  • 2014 Miller

    Russell V Miller, 2014 Miller's Australian Competition and Consumer Law Annotated (Thomson Reuters, 36th ed, 2014)

    4 April 2014
    It is 40 years since the introduction of the Trade Practices Act 1974. The 36th edition of Miller’s continues to be a primary resource in the area of consumer law, product safety, and competition.

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  • Indigenous Crime and Settler Law

    Heather Douglas and Mark Finnane, Indigenous Crime and Settler Law (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012)

    28 March 2014
    This text analyses the response of the criminal law in Australia to the victimization and crimes of one indigenous person against another. It is a work of history that deals with the tension between multiple socio-cultural formations in the one territory. It is the story of the legacy of Empire, misunderstanding indigenous culture, contradictions, and good intentions.

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  • The Law of Private Nuisance

    Allan Beever, The Law of Private Nuisance (Hart Publishing, 2013)

    28 March 2014
    This monograph seeks to recast the law of nuisance as the method that the common law utilizes prioritizing property rights so that conflicts between users of property can be resolved.

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  • The Jurists: A Critical History

    James Gordley, The Jurists: A Critical History (Oxford University Press, 2013)

    28 March 2014
    This is a work that will appeal to those interested in understanding the historical basis of various fundamental principles in the law. The Jurists is an analysis of various ideas within the cultural and historical context from which they emanated. The role of jurists in the development of these early ideas and concepts now forms the foundations of western private law. Gordley, for example, identifies the development of the second century "formulary procedure", which is a precursor to our modern civil procedure and then critically analyses how various concepts in contract and tort are revealed.

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  • Lord Mansfield – Justice in the Age of Reason

    Norman S Poser, Lord Mansfield – Justice in the Age of Reason (Queen's University Press, 2013)

    21 March 2014
    Poser’s work catalogues the extraordinary life of William Murray (later Lord Mansfield) from his beginnings with a treasonous Scottish family to the very core of Eighteenth century British establishment. In 1756 William Murray was appointed Chief Justice of the Court of Kings Bench and raised to the peerage with the title of Lord Mansfield. Poser explains in detail the influence that Lord Mansfield had on commerce, freedom of the press, religious freedom, women and marriage in an entertaining book.

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  • Introduction to Forensic DNA Evidence for Criminal Justice Professionals

    Jane Moira Taupin, Introduction to Forensic DNA Evidence for Criminal Justice Professionals (CRC Press, 2014)

    21 March 2014
    This concise work introduces to a non-scientific audience the important area of forensic DNA evidence. Taupin explains the strengths and limitations of DNA profiling evidence, the basics of DNA profiling methodology, and then provides a brief explanation of the various types of DNA techniques available. There is a useful chapter directed towards ways both the prosecution and the defence lawyers might test the veracity of DNA evidence in the preparation for a hearing.

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  • Solicitors’ Negligence and Liability

    William Flenley QC, Tom Leech QC, Thomas Grant, Graham Reid, and Paul Mitchell, Solicitors’ Negligence and Liability (Bloomsbury Professional, 3 ed, 2013)

    14 March 2014
    The third edition of “Flenley & Leech” is a comprehensive treatment and extends to over 1000 pages. It is the leading text on solicitors’ liability and negligence in the United Kingdom and will continue to be a useful comparative resource for the Australian practitioner working is this wide ranging area of law.

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  • Housing, Land, and Property Restitution Rights of Refugees and Displaced Persons – Laws, Cases and Materials

    Scott Leckie, Housing, Land, and Property Restitution Rights of Refugees and Displaced Persons – Laws, Cases and Materials (Cambridge University Press, 2013)

    14 March 2014
    The Pinheiro principles recognise that millions of refugees and displaced persons worldwide continue to live in precarious and uncertain situations, and that all refugees and displaced persons have a right to voluntary return, in safety and dignity, to their original or former habitual homes and lands. In order for such principles to work for the benefit of the dispossessed there must be a legal framework that recognises and legitimises a right to housing, land, and property restitution. This is a specialized text of collected materials dealing with the rights of refugees and displaced persons to have restored to them the housing, land and property rights they held at the time of their displacement.

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  • 13 Ways to Steal a Bicycle – Theft Law in the Information Age

    Stuart P Green, 13 Ways to Steal a Bicycle – Theft Law in the Information Age (Harvard University Press , 2012)

    14 March 2014
    This book is about the disorganised state of the law of theft in most Anglophone jurisdictions, though the focus is on the position in the USA and the UK. In essence Green is concerned with the dissonance between what people see as criminal conduct and the way the law of theft responds. For an extreme example, there is a large section of the community (mainly adolescent boys) that would no doubt support the criminalisation of conduct in the virtual world of online gaming. How does theft law respond in a world of intangibles where the notion of property is becoming highly sophisticated? Green calls for reform in a book that will appeal to regulators and academics.

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