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With over 158,000 print titles in our collection, the Supreme Court Library provides the most comprehensive range of legal resources in Queensland to the judiciary, legal profession and members of the public with matters before the Courts.

Each week, a selection of important titles recently added to the collection are reviewed by members of the level 16 Quay Central chambers. A full list of new titles is available online via our catalogue, with copies also available for perusal at the Brisbane Reference Desk.

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New Titles

  • Preston & Newsom’s Restrictive Covenants Affecting Freehold Land

    George L. Newsom, Preston & Newsom’s Restrictive Covenants Affecting Freehold Land (Sweet & Maxwell, 10th ed, 2013)

    16 May 2014
    The tenth edition of this highly specialised text continues to explain the law in the United Kingdom concerning restrictive covenants over freehold land.

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  • Economic Loss

    Robby Bernstein, Economic Loss (Sweet & Maxwell, 3rd ed, 2013)

    16 May 2014
    The third edition of Volume 2 of Economic Loss comprises more than 1,700 pages. “Specific Applications” details and comprehensively analyses the cases and material concerning economic loss in the context of product liability, nonfeasance, negligent mis-statement, and contract.

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  • Understanding National e-Conveyancing

    Peter Rosier, Understanding National e-Conveyancing (LexisNexis Butterworths, 2014)

    9 May 2014
    e-Conveyancing is a reality. In this brief work, the author explains how the system works, the legal framework, and the practical aspects of electronic conveyancing.

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  • Control of Government Action – Text, Cases & Commentary

    Robin Creyke and John McMillan, Control of Government Action – Text, Cases & Commentary (LexisNexis Butterworths, 3rd ed, 2012)

    9 May 2014
    Creyke and McMillan’s text comprehensively covers the various legal responses to government action. It has a wider ambit than Aronsen and Grove’s comparatively austere Judicial Review of Administrative Action. For example, Creyke and McMillan have broken the text into parts dealing with accountability in an administrative State; the framework for challenge and control; the criteria for lawful decision making; remedies and information and access.

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  • The Patient and the Practitioner - Health Law and Ethics in Australia

    Sonia Allan and Meredith Blake, The Patient and the Practitioner - Health Law and Ethics in Australia (LexisNexis Butterworths Australia, 2014)

    2 May 2014
    There are some thorny questions that arise when the question of health care and consent are considered in the context of minors and incompetent adults. The parens patriae jurisdiction of the Supreme Court is a veritable briar patch for healthcare professionals, lawyers and ethicists. This text is a comprehensive analysis of the law and ethics that arise from the various decisions, actions and therapies made or recommended by health care professionals for patients.

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  • Understanding Personal Property Securities Law

    Del Cseti and Anne Wardell, Understanding Personal Property Securities Law (CCH Australia Limited, 2nd ed, 2013)

    2 May 2014
    This work does not profess to be a definitive guide and is introductory in nature. The audience is credit managers, finance teams as well as lawyers new to the area. As would be expected the text explains the genesis of the Personal Property Securities Act 2009 ; the scope of its operation; the nature of security agreements and there is a chapter ambitiously entitled “How do you achieve perfection?” It is a practical text that uses examples to explain various aspects of the operation of the PPSA.

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  • Australian Anti-Discrimination Law

    Neil Rees, Simon Rice and Dominique Allen, Australian Anti-Discrimination Law (The Federation Press , 2nd ed, 2014)

    24 April 2014
    As a body of law, anti-discrimination law in Australia is criticised for its lack of coherence. The attempts of the Gillard government in 2012 to consolidate and modernise Commonwealth anti-discrimination legislation did not meet with any public favour. The second edition of this text collects and explains the role of anti-discrimination law, but also covers harassment, vilification, and victimization. The book also helpfully has a chapter on the complaints and adjudication procedures as well as a look at the possible remedies available.

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  • Risk and Negligence in Wills, Estates, and Trusts

    Martyn Frost, Penelope Reed QC and Mark Baxter, Risk and Negligence in Wills, Estates, and Trusts (Oxford University Press, 2nd ed, 2014)

    17 April 2014
    The experience of the United Kingdom will continue to be an invaluable resource to practitioners in the area of wills and estates. The authors have comprehensively dealt with the issue of negligence in the context of will preparation with a detailed analysis of cases such as Ross v. Caunters and White v. Jones. There is analysis of wider issues of the duty of care, for example, that the duty of care may well not extend to persons or a class of persons that the solicitor is not told about and also the obligations on a wronged beneficiary to mitigate their loss. A large part of the text is taken up with discussion of the administration of estates and trusts. Here the focus is to improve practices so as to avoid the risk of negligence claims and disputes regarding the administration of an estate or trust. The text contains a number of useful appendices, for example, “information needed in an emergency will pack”. This is in essence a list of things necessary for the practitioner when called on to prepare a will urgently. The text stands out because it analyses the nature of a solicitor’s exposure to liability in the context of will preparation and the subsequent administration, but also provides practical advice on how to establish good practices to minimise such exposure.

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  • Intellectual Property Law of Plants

    Mark D. Janis, Herbert H. Jervis and Richard Peet, Intellectual Property Law of Plants (Oxford University Press, 2014)

    17 April 2014
    The concept that biological material – plants specifically – can be the subject of intellectual property protection was recognized in the United States in the early 1930s. In order to protect investments in research and development in the area of “elite plants” the need for robust intellectual property protection is undoubted. This book analyses the highly specialized body of intellectual property law that has been created for various sorts of plant innovation at both an international and domestic level.

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  • Michael Trebilcock, Anthony Duggan, Lorne Sossin (Eds), Middle Income Access to Justice (University of Toronto Press, 2012)

    17 April 2014
    Just as access to justice in Australia is problematic, so too is the experience in Canada. The primary theme of this book is the inability of many low to middle income earners to gain access to civil justice. Simply, middle income earners do not qualify for legal aid, and cannot afford the cost of legal representation in a civil matter. The consequence is that there is a staggering increase in the number of individuals trying to navigate the civil justice system without any or adequate legal assistance leading to many feeling increasingly alienated from the legal system. The editors have collected an impressive array of authors who draw on empirical studies to identify the legal needs of middle income earners and then proceed to provide alternatives and possible solutions. The first considered is that prevention is better than cure and that the best way to deal with access to justice issues is to identify ways of lowering the number of disputes thereby reducing demands on the justice system. Another alternative is to reconsider the forms of assistance. One suggestion is there be a revision of the role that Judges, court appointed mediators and clerks play in the provision of assistance to unrepresented litigants. The editors and authors call for a deep reform of the civil justice system in Canada and the text will prove a useful resource for those wishing to better understand the nature of the problem.

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