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With over 158,000 print titles in our collection, the Supreme Court Library provides the most comprehensive range of legal resources in Queensland to the judiciary, legal profession and members of the public with matters before the Courts.

Each week, a selection of important titles recently added to the collection are reviewed by members of the level 16 Quay Central chambers. A full list of new titles is available online via our catalogue, with copies also available for perusal at the Brisbane Reference Desk.

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New Titles

  • Phipson on Evidence

    Hodge M Malek QC, et al (eds), Phipson on Evidence (Sweet & Maxwell, 18th ed, 2013)

    19 September 2014
    At well over 1,600 pages, the eighteenth edition of Phipson on Evidence remains the text of first resort in relation to the law of evidence in the United Kingdom. This edition takes account of recent changes to the UK Civil Procedure Rules and Criminal Procedure Rules. Amongst the many other topics in evidence law, the text provides an important resource for matters such as judicial notice, estoppels and the examination of witnesses.

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  • Forensic Science and The Law – A Guide for Police, Lawyers and Expert Witnesses

    Dr Anna Sandiford, Forensic Science and The Law – A Guide for Police, Lawyers and Expert Witnesses (Thomson Reuters, 2013)

    19 September 2014
    Dr Sandiford is a forensic scientist from New Zealand and her text is directed at those needing basic guidance in particular types of expert forensic evidence. There are specific chapters dealing with forensic evidence and its analysis concerning: drugs, trace material, document examination, fingerprints, fires and explosions, alcohol, toxicology, DNA and bloodstain patterns. Dr Sandiford explores each of the topics in clear and concise language that makes it easily accessible to the non-scientist.

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  • Commercial Trusts

    Nuncio D'Angelo, Commercial Trusts (LexisNexis Butterworths, 2014)

    5 September 2014
    In this monograph, Dr D’Angelo contends that the trust has evolved from its historical role as a "guardian" to that of its modern day manifestation as a commercial vehicle used for entrepreneurial purposes. The author develops this argument over seven chapters commencing with the concepts and principles of a "commercial trust" which follows into the evolution of the commercial trusts in Australia. Analysis then moves to the legal risks of a beneficiary being an equity investor through to an analysis of the legal risks adopted by a commercial trustee. Chapter 5 concerns the legal risks of a creditor of a commercial trust and chapter 6 concerns the insolvency of a commercial trust. The final chapter poses some thoughtful comments on reform of the commercial trust.

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  • Dispute Resolution in Australia

    David Spencer and Samantha Hardy, Dispute Resolution in Australia (Thomson Reuters (Professional) Australia Limited, 3rd ed, 2014)

    5 September 2014
    The third edition of this introductory text contains the usual fare concerning negotiation, mediation, arbitration and the like. This edition provides a number of new chapters concerning "conflict coaching"; dispute resolution in the context of the criminal law system; and also workplace dispute resolution. The emerging area of "conflict coaching" occurs where a coach and a client communicate on a one-on-one basis to improve the client’s understanding of a particular conflict and to improve their own interaction strategies and interaction skills with other disputants. The book is a useful catalogue of materials in the area of dispute resolution.

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  • The Law of Refugee Status

    James C. Hathaway and Michelle Foster, The Law of Refugee Status (Cambridge University Press, 2nd ed, 2014)

    29 August 2014
    The first edition of this seminal work was published in 1991. The second edition is a substantial renovation offering new analysis of the interpretation of the refugee definition set by the United Nations 1951 Refugee Convention.

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  • The Declaration of Independence in Historical Context – American State Papers, Petitions, Proclamations & Letters of the Delegates to the First National Congresses

    Barry Alan Shain (Ed), The Declaration of Independence in Historical Context – American State Papers, Petitions, Proclamations & Letters of the Delegates to the First National Congresses (Yale University Press, 2014)

    15 August 2014
    This impressive tomb seeks to provide historical context to explain better the various subtle forces at work leading to the Declaration of Independence. The work does this by providing various primary source materials from the era of the American Revolution. This collection of colonial and continental letters, petitions, resolves and declarations demonstrates that the Declaration of Independence was the culmination of a 12 year struggle. The book provides a better understanding of the grievances - "the repeated injuries and usurpations" meted out by the King of Great Britain. This together with the misgivings evident from the exchanges between the 13 colonies add colour and light to the Declaration of Independence.

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  • Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500 - 1850

    Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (Eds), Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500 - 1850 (New York University Press, 2013)

    15 August 2014
    "Legal pluralism" is the term used to describe the existence of more than one legal system in the same geographical location. As a study, it concerns the tensions that arise in the operation of these systems alongside each other. It is an analytical tool used by academics to conduct a comparative study of empires. This book seeks to illuminate how people in colonized countries negotiated "native" and "introduced" laws. It is a book that will appeal to legal academics and historians.

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  • Lives of the Australian Chief Justices - Sir Charles Lilley

    J. M. Bennett, Lives of the Australian Chief Justices - Sir Charles Lilley (The Federation Press, 2014)

    8 August 2014
    Sir Charles Lilley was the appointed as Queensland’s second Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1879. Dr. Bennett has meticulously catalogued Lilley’s life from his early days in Newcastle upon Tyne through to his departure from the law on the wake of the Grimley debacle. At the time of his death, his contribution to providing a free and secular education to all primary age boys and girls in Queensland was seen as his enduring legacy. Lilley, whether by reason of his politics or his overt errors of judgment, will always be a figure that divides opinion. Dr. Bennett exposes a man who was one of a select few to have held the offices of Premier of Queensland and that of Chief Justice - an achievement that seems impossible today. In so doing, Dr. Bennett provides a balanced assessment of a man who is remembered more today for scandal than the real contribution he made to Queensland.

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  • Dr. Dayle Smith, Judicial Murder? MacArthur and the Tokyo War Crimes Trial (CreateSpace, 2013)

    8 August 2014

    In this book, Dr. Smith unpacks the circumstances surrounding the “trial” and execution of Koki Hirota in the wake of Japan’s surrender at the end of the Second World War.

    Koki Hirota is the focus of attention because he was the only civilian executed for “war crimes” at the end of a 2 and a half year trial conducted by the “International Military Tribunal for the Far East”. General MacArthur as “Supreme Commander” established this tribunal under the terms of the Japanese Surrender. The trial of Hirota and six others was a travesty. One of the dissenting judgments described the process of the trial as “a sham employment of a legal process for the satisfaction of a thirst for revenge”. This book is in many ways deeply disturbing because of the abuse of power that Dr. Smith seeks to expose. In short, Dr. Smith contends that MacArthur had no legitimate power to arrest, detain, try, and execute the likes of Hirota. It is an interesting analysis that examines the hypocrisy of “winner’s justice”.

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  • English Nuns and the Law in the Middle Ages: Cloistered Nuns and Their Lawyers, 1293-1540

    Elizabeth Makowski, English Nuns and the Law in the Middle Ages: Cloistered Nuns and Their Lawyers, 1293-1540 (Boydell & Brewer, 2012)

    1 August 2014
    This book focuses on a specific period in the Middle Ages in England to explain how the rise of legal professionalism went hand-in-hand with the successful establishment of cloistered orders of nuns at this time (prior to dissolution under Henry VIII). As substantial property holders unable to appear personally due to their enclosure, nuns sought the services of lawyers in protecting their rights, holdings and endowments before the courts. The book gives particular insight into the established Bridgettine order at Syon and the lawsuits involving various Abbesses of Syon in the courts of common law and chancery, including the long-running dispute over the portion of its endowment that Henry VI took to enrich the newly created Kings College, Cambridge. The book begins by looking at the origins of cloistered orders, before moving on to the rise of the legal profession in England and the methods by which nuns retained and instructed their lawyers. The second part of the book focuses on certain select cases in common law and chancery, as well as episcopal arbitration and papal appeals.

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